Fun with Maps 327&328

Map 327 shows how landlocked each province of Europe is. That’s not a thing you probably thought you needed to know prior to reading that first sentence, but if you are like me (hungry and tired?), then you may have realized just how important that information is. It’s not important in a traditional sense, of…

Fun with Maps 325&326

I have been away from the blog for about a month and probably will be for another stint here as Beth is expected to give birth in the next week or less (hopefully less). I’ll be sure to share our birth story as soon as I can after it happens but having a newborn around…

Fun with Maps 323&324

Map 323 comes from an article on Curbed.com titled The nation’s most exciting park project is taking shape in North Carolina. I saw the article by happenstance, and only skimmed it, but came upon this beautiful map. It is a map/rendering of what the developer (Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates) has planned for Dorothea Dix Park…

Fun with Maps 321&322

I normally prefer not to give you two United States maps in the same post but Independence Day is tomorrow so I’m going to roll with it. Happy Fourth of July everyone! Map 321 features the U.S cities with the most and least student debt. Student loan debt is a big topic right now because…

Fun with Maps 319&320

Map 319 displays the minimum wage in each of the United States. The federal minimum wage was first established in 1938. Since then, Congress has occasionally raised the dollar amount based on inflation. May of 2007 was the last time that happened when it was raised to $7.25 (a change that went into effect in…

Fun with Maps 315&316

Map 315 features the geology of Texas, as in “Don’t mess with…”. I found this map through Pinterest (home to thousands of maps, by the way) and was stunned by how diverse the geology of Texas is. It’s a very large territory, of course, but it’s still interesting how many different eras are represented in…

Fun with Maps 313&314

Unfortunately, Map 313 features the deforestation of Los Angeles, California (sorry for the downer right at the top). Apparently, the “city has lost a shocking number of trees over the last decade, according to a group of USC professors from the Spatial Sciences Institute and Urban Wildlands Group who used aerial imagery to track the de-greening of LA. Their study,…