Fun with Maps 285&286

I recently found a blog post titled, “10 Rare Landmarks on the Map of Nigeria” and clicked on it expecting to see a big, beautiful map. I was, however, disappointed to find no map at all, just a list of places. The headline contains the word ‘map’ and everything so I’m not the crazy one in this situation (I said to myself out loud thus calling that assertion into question). So, I next opened Google Maps’ custom map tool and started plotting the ‘rare landmarks’ for myself in what has now become Map 285.

Map 285A

I know some of the locations smoosh a bit in the overall view of Nigeria so I’ve included some zoomed-in maps as well.

Map 285BMap 285CMap 285D

I have never visited Nigeria (nor any part of Africa) so I cannot say if these ten locations are truly the most beautiful, important, or even rare but I do hope the original poster will see and enjoy this map. It’s not that fancy but any map is better than no map (especially when you imply there will be a map). To learn about the ten locations in Nigeria I recommend checking the original post.

 

* * * * *

Map 286 shows how much snowfall it takes over a 24 hour period to close schools. The data was compiled into map form by Reddit user Alexandr Trubetskoy a.k.a. atrubetskoy but it was sent to me via my brother-in-law and an article in The Atlantic. Trubetskoy used data “taken from hundreds of various points from user responses…interpolated using NOAA’s average annual snowfall days map to make his map, which is, in this author’s opinion, beautiful. He did include a few clarifications regarding the data. The green areas are labeled ‘Any Snow’ but could include a simple prediction of snow. That’s right! In much of the South a mere prediction of snow can cause schools to close just to avoid the potential hassle. He also points out that certain urban areas have better infrastructure in place to deal with heavy snowfall. It is also stated that Northern areas are often affected more by cold temperatures and high winds than snowfall since the white stuff is easily dealt with if you have the right amount of plows and snow-blowers.

Map 286

I’m Minnesotan so snow is something I know a bit about. I don’t love it (hate it, actually) but growing up here has provided me with the minimal level of expertise required to comment on this map. There is no guarantee school gets cancelled with any significant snowfall here in Minnesota. My school district growing up stayed closed a total of two times due to snowfall in 12 years. We also had two closures and one early release due to water main breaks. I’m not sure how accurate it is but it was a popular opinion around school that our particular district was highly stingy when it came to issuing snow days. Every morning after a snow storm kids across the Midwest turn on the morning news and watch the scrolling ticker at the bottom of the screen hoping to see their school district listed. They came up alphabetically and every single time Houston, Howard, or Hutchinson arrived it was another day where Hopkins didn’t. It is likely that schools in the South close just as often as my district did growing up despite getting far less snow each Winter.

How often did your school close due to snow? For those further North do you remember what those amazing snow days were like? I loved watching Bob Barker’s Price is Right, personally.

Until next time,

 

Bryan Signature 2

 

 

 

Bonus Map Link: 2018 Midterm Election Map

Bonus Bonus Map Link: Another 2018 Midterm Election Map

Bonus Bonus Bonus Map Link: Map of states that give time off for voting

 

 

 

 

Sources/Links:
https://buzznigeria.com/nigerian-map/
http://www.google.com/maps
https://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2014/01/map-how-much-snow-it-typically-takes-to-cancel-school-in-the-us/283470/?fbclid=IwAR0O12VCcY948jBsO7JFu7Hyfke84N3kwVn81XCYCgadQSXOzEfrA7gdkHg&utm_campaign=the-atlantic&utm_content=5bea848c9ac56400015e3eac_ta&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.